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Another GPL infringement ?

One allways finds interesting things online 🙂

I think everybody shoul take a look here : Take Care ( 3MB ) especially at the last page.

It’s a powerpoint presentation from Profdoc a swedish healthcare provider.

Well…what do you think of it ?

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Filed under: General

6 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Lopo says:

    Hi!

    Some points on this:

    #1 Is Care2x using GNU/GPL 3 already? If not it should.
    #2 GNU/GPL 2 does not enforce that Care2x mention must be visible BUT it enforce that it must be mentioned in the CODE headers
    #3 The project seems to be made in .NET so, even if it is based on ideas from Care2x it would be not use Care2x code and wouldn’t be a GNU/GPL infringment
    #4 ProfDoc can, at any particular time, fork Care2x to a specific project IF THEY KEEP THE BORROW CODE under the same license.
    #5 The last screenshot could be a Copyright infringment, which is a different subject.
    #6 Last. People forking do not need to thank you — even if it would be nice — because that is not a Legal question posed by the license but only by good breeding and ethics.

    Neverthless, Care2x sole copyright ownership belongs to ElpĂ­dio Latorilla as explicit inside the files (excluding those parts made by others and /or with specific copyright notices.

    There is no LEGAL entity representing Care2x besides ElpĂ­dio Latorilla himself, so he his the only person that can ask ProfDoc about their product and that specific screenshot.

    Hope I could help the discussion on this.

  2. Lopo says:

    Ah! Just to mention that if a piece of code is licensed under GNU/GPL all the program that includes that piece of code must use the same license. Even if a program just use GNU/GPL code in a library-like way to communicate with other code or data it must use the same license.

    They invented the GNU/LGPL precisely to allow software licensed with a non-GNU/GPL-compatible license to communicate with it. And there are Open Source licenses (OSI Approved) that are not compatible with GNU/GPL.

    IF ProfDoc just made some modular interface to communicate with Care2x on the server side or uses without significant changes its database structure that could be a GNU/GPL Copyright Infringment.

    Must remember that those licenses (all software licenses that not deal with patent issues) are addendum to the International Copyright Agreements and related Legislation. So, when we are talking about GNU/GPL infringment we are atlking about Copyright Infringment.

    Hope I could help the discussion on this.

  3. Lopo says:

    At

    #5 The last screenshot could be a Copyright infringment, which is a different subject.

    I meant a «”simple” Copyright infringment». Sorry for that confusion.

  4. care2x says:

    copy pasting from : http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.htm

    a. Does the GPL require that source code of modified versions be posted to the public?
    reads : But if you release the modified version to the public in some way, the GPL requires you to make the modified source code available to the program’s users, under the GPL.

    b. Am I required to claim a copyright on my modifications to a GPL-covered program?
    reads : …either way you must release the modified version, as a whole, under the GPL

    c. If I use a piece of software that has been obtained under the GNU GPL, am I allowed to modify the original code into a new program, then distribute and sell that new program commercially?
    …but only under the terms of the GNU GPL.

    and so on…
    so to simply it : GPL is a viral license, thus any work derived from a copyleft license must be copyleft when distributed…

    just my 2 cents…

  5. Lopo says:

    Exactly what I’ve said 🙂

  6. Lopo says:

    @ care2x

    Did you saw the presentation?

    I’m not defending them but with the exception of the last screen that product does not seem to be Care2x-based.

    Just taking inspiration is not a copyright infringment under GNU/GPL or under “regular” copyright law.

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